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Scentless mayweed

Tripleurospermum inodorum

Scentless Mayweed can cause problems in winter and spring sown crops due to its long germination period. This weed grows rapidly and competes strongly with crops. Dense populations can smother and severely restrict crop growth so it needs to be controlled.

It is an annual dicotyledon and grows 10 to 80cm tall.

Leaves and flowersFine feather type green leaves. The flower is white and resembles a daisy.
Number of seeds produced per plant10,000 - 200,000
Seed shedAugust to October
Germination periodAll year, with peaks in autumn and spring
Germination depthUp to 5cm (generally much more shallow)
Primary dormancyNone
Does it have a secondary dormancy?Transient
Seed longevity5 years
Factor promoting germinationLight
Rate of seed decline with cultivations43% annually
Geographical locationScentless mayweed is the most widespread of the mayweed family found on arable land. It can be plentiful on arable land, predominantly in lowland areas. It thrives in open habitats and in less disturbed soils.
Soil TypePrefers heavy and fertile soil types particularly warmer areas where pH > 4.5 and preferable >5.5.
ImpactMayweed is competitive in both spring and winter sown cereals taking yield but it can also cause problems at harvest with blocked machinery and contaminating seed samples. 15 plants m2 = 5% yield loss in cereals.
Herbicide resistanceALS TSR

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